Horseman in Maggieknocktar by Charles Gordon

This part of Boharm is good farmland. The nearest farm is Knockandhu, which is now a riding school. Beyond and to the right is Dinnyhorn, and the farm visible above the roof of Knockandhu is Auchmadies. Coldhome is on the skyline. Photo by Anne Burgess source: geograph.org.uk

This part of Boharm is good farmland. The nearest farm is Knockandhu, which is now a riding school. Beyond and to the right is Dinnyhorn, and the farm visible above the roof of Knockandhu is Auchmadies. Coldhome is on the skyline.

Charles’ Father held the tenancy on Coldhome Farm near Craigellachie and Maggieknockatar. His mother was the Farmer’s wife. He started working with the horses when he left school at the age of 14 in 1942. His working day began around 5 a.m when he fed and watered the horses and cleaned them out. He put the harness on them for the plough. It took about 2 hours to get the horses ready. Then he had his breakfast from 7-8 a.m. At the end of the working day when they had finished ploughing they took off the harnesses and cleaned them. The dirt needed to be brushed off them. In the summer the horses were set out into a field and in the winter they were given feed in a stable. he never diod any of the ploughing competitions but he did enjoy watching them. When his Father got a tractor he had to leave and get a job at a farm near Portgordon, Taennachy Farm. He learnt how to drive a tractor. Even though he had to move away from home to work at the other farm he went home at the weekends with his washing for his Mother to wash. He left those clothes for the week and took another set of clothes for the following week.

Memory contributed by Charles Gordon from Aberlour

Additional Information

Horse Ploughing
Click here to see a Horse ploughing film on Scottish Screen onlineWatch a 1955 film of horse ploughing 

The film shows everyday life and work of a Scottish ploughman, shot at Smeaton Farm, Dalkeith.
It was made in 1955 and lasts 11 minutes.

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