Lab Assistant at Thomson Cod Liver Oil Factory by Jean MacPherson

Thomson's cod liver oil cream advert from the Northern Scot Christmas Post 1905Jean started work for Thomson Cod Liver Oil factory in 1942 at the age of 15. She went on to work for the Thomson family for the next thirty years. At the time she joined George Thomson worked for the firm. Her normal working day began at 9 a.m. and ended at 5.30 p.m. She was given an hour off for lunch from 1 – 2 p.m.  Her starting wage was £1 a week.

The cod liver oil was stored in metal barrels and decanted into glass bottles and latterly plastic ones during the time she worked for the firm. There was a plain and an iodised version of the oil for chesty people. They also made and sold capsules flavoured with blackcurrant.

Her journey to and from her home in Bishopmill could be very difficult. During the period of WW2 her walks home at night were very dark. This was due the lack of street lighting i.e. the blackouts. There also very bad winters with heavy snowfalls throughout the 1940s. Jean had to wade through the snow in her Wellington boots.

One summer as Jean turned 18 in April 1960, the employees were taken a work’s holiday. Jean had to obtain her first passport. In two separate groups of eight (so the factory could remain open) they travelled down to London by train and stayed at the Ambassador Hotel. During the first week of their holiday they went to see a variety of the city’s tourist attractions including Madame Tussauds and the Lyons Tea Rooms. The following week Jean’s group travelled on to Paris, managing to catch the last train from Calais before the rail workers went on strike. They were not allowed to take anymore than £15 out of the country. They were issued with ration books which were handed to the hotel. Jean remembers having a lovely room in Paris where she could smell the bakery.

They visited a number of famous Parisian landmarks including the Avenue des Champs-Élysées, Eiffel Tower and the Palace of Versailles. At the Louvre they saw the painting of the Mona Lisa by Leonardo de Vinci.

Memory contributed by Jean McPherson at the Messages and Memories Event at Elgin Library

Additional Information
Grace's guide link

Lyons Coffee Shop information on a history of shops website

 

Book about Wireless Station wavelenghts written by R. Thomson (Horace’s Father?) in the 1920s.

An example of one of the porcelain cod liver oil spoons produced and sold by Thompsons.

Life as a Junior Reporter for the Northern Scot by Bruce Taylor

Piper Alpha Memorial Window  source: wikicommons

Piper Alpha Memorial Window at Ferryhill Church, Aberdeen Source: Wikicommons

Bruce enjoyed writing at school and generally enjoyed his English lessons. He left school in 1961 at the age of 15 and went to Websters College at the top of Batchen Lane in Elgin to study shorthand and typing. His first job was for the Northern Scot newspaper where he described his first duties as a “general dogsbody”. They included buying cigarettes for the Editor, covering events such as  Flower Shows etc.  He had to travel to local towns including Lossiemouth and Dufftown to look for stories. All the time he was looking for stories of general interest. He travelled by himself as there was no staff photographer at this time.

When he turned 22 he moved to the Press and Journal Newspaper. Someone came from the P&J to his house to offer him the job, which included an increase in wages. Bruce accepted the offer and his earnings rose from £16 a week to £25 per week (a 56% increase).

During his time at the paper the biggest story he covered was the Piper Alpha Disaster in July 1988.  Bruce was the first reporter to travel out to the rig site, the day after the accident. By that time the flames were out and all that was left was the smoking skeleton of the platform. Bruce wrote about his first impressions and his reports were run on other papers as well as his own.

Bruce thought the best part of the job was the contact with people and helping them to communicate an issue they were concerned with. This could be raising funds for someone who was ill or a local campaign against a new road or the closure of an institution. He also covered Moray Council meetings and was an advocate for those who would have had no voice. It gave him great satisfaction to see his own stories in the Press and also when some stories were taken up by the National Press.

Additional Information

British Newspaper ArchiveThe Press and Journal has 13,234 back issues lodged with the British Newspaper Archive holds a number of Press and Journal newspapers in a digitised form. The BNA website

New Scottish online resource related to the Piper Alpha Disaster. The resource is part of the Glow Intranet community.
 Piper Alpha Disaster - Education Scotland website with a link to the glow-based resource.

Milk boy for Bishopmill Dairy by Bill Forsyth

Bill started work in 1937 at the age of 9/10. His Father had heard about the job in his job at the Tile Works. Joseph Farquhar owned Bishopmill Farm, which was the left hand side of the road on the way out of Bishopmill towards Lossiemouth. It was just past the old Moray Poor House site. He worked for the farm’s dairy before school every day of the week. He arrived about 7 a.m. and collected tin cans, which held about 1 pint of pasturised full cream milk. He could hook 5 cans on either side of his bike. He then set off to deliver milk to the local customers. The job carried on through the holidays as well. When the war started Joseph Farquhar’s son, also called Bill was called up. Bill was asked to help with the milk round. Joseph had two milk floats to deliver the milk to his Elgin customers.

Easterton farm Roseisle © Copyright Anne Burgess and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Easterton Farm Roseisle Copyright Anne Burgess Creative Commons Licence

When Bill reached 13 he left school to work for the dairy full-time. He learnt how to control a horse and cart so he could then take one of the carts on local milk deliveries. Two large milk churns were placed in the back of his cart along with a one pint tin jug to dispense the milk from the large cans into whatever the customer had at hand for their milk delivery.The route he took was from Bishopmill along Lesmurdie Road, Kingmills, over the old Bridge to the Cathedral, up King Street, cut across Institution Road, round the Station Hotel and then back to the Dairy. The caretaker at the Cathedral always had two sandwiches ready made with fresh butter and rhubarb jam. One for Bill and one for the horse. No-one had fridges in those days so Bill went on his round every day. When he returned to the dairy he handed back the tin cans for cleaning and put the horse to pasture in the fields around the dairy. Then the cart needed to be tidied up. Next Bill went off to Easterton Farm on Covesea Road to collect the cans of milk for the following day. The milk was processed and pasturised at the dairy ready for the next day’s delivery. Each week Bill handed over his wage to his Mother and received spending money back.

Cattle were also kept on the farm. The dung heap was situated behind the Old Bishopmill School and the smell could be quite strong on some days.

Bill remembered the Old School at Bishopmill had traditional school desks with slates, ink pots and blackboards.

 Memory contributed by Bill Forsyth at the Messages and Memories Event at Elgin Library June 2014

Additional Information

Bishopmill History

nls map referencesLocal Maps of the area
http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/   Either choose Find by place which allows the user to select specific maps individually e.g. This 1938 (published 1946) map of Elgin shows all the detail of Bishopmill including old and new school, the old town centre roads before the bypass, the gas works etc… http://maps.nls.uk/view/75529911

There are various books which describe Bishopmill and its development including the schools. The History of the Local Area is written about in detail in the New Statistical Account of Scotland. Search by putting Bishopmill in the left hand search box or go to page 98 onwards in the Elgin section of the book.
Bishopmill Google booksMoray Poor House, Bishopmill

http://www.workhouses.org.uk/Morayshire/  The Map of the Moray Poor House on this web page also shows the location of the local primary school on Balmoral Terrace and the farm fields around Bishopmill around 1905. To look at other old maps of the area go to the Useful Links/Scottish Maps page on this website and follow the NLS link.

List of Moray Combination Poorhouse residents in 1881

Working as a van porter for Henderson’s Furniture by Peter Logie

Hendersons_furniture ElginPeter started work at the age of 15 in 1956. His first job was at Henderson’s furniture in Elgin.  He had left school with no qualifications and he had heard about the job. Peter felt that in those days there were jobs for anyone willing to work. The Local Mills could be difficult to get work in. Young people had their names put down for mill work several years earlier, by their parents who worked there. Peter’s working week ran from Monday to Friday with a half day on Saturday. He earned around £5-6 per week with two weeks holiday annual leave including Christmas Day as a holiday.  Peter’s Father was in the building trade and for him Christmas Day was a working day with New Year’s day as a day off.

Peter delivered new furniture from Henderson’s and also did removals all over Elgin through to Aberdeen and Inverness. On a rare occasion he stayed overnight. It was very hard work with lots of heavy lifting. Four people were on the removal team and two people on furniture deliveries. Sometimes getting furniture into houses was difficult. Windows could be a useful way of getting furniture into a house. Peter stayed in the job for three years and he really enjoyed it.

He went on to work for Grant Furniture until he was made redundant. Looking for a change he took a job as a kitchen porter washing dishes and general “odd bod”.  One day the Head Chef was ill and the owner came down and said  “Peter, you are doing breakfast tomorrow”. From then on he continued to work in the kitchen as a Commis Chef for 2-3 years. He went to college at Elgin Technical College to do his City and Gulids 7061. From there he went to work at the Seafield Arms in Cullen returning to take his City and Guilds 7062 (distinction pass) then back to Cullen for a further 2 years. Peter moved from there to work at the Eight Acres, where he remained the second chef for the next twenty years. He did not want to be the Head Chef as there was a lot of organisational work involved. The hotel had around sixty bedrooms and held functions for up to 200. Most nights there were 40 covers to serve. Peter liked being busy.

Leather strap from the Keith Memory Blog website

Leather strap from the Keith Primary School Memory Blog website

Old Bishopmill School memory
The original Bishopmill Primary School was on Balmoral Terrace and it closed in the mid 1930s moving to its current position on Morriston Road. Peter was at both schools. He remembers taking home the leather strap so as to avoid receiving it as a punishment. Unfortunately his idea was flawed as his Father used the strap to give him 6 lashes for taking it and then when he took it back to school he got six more from the Head Master for stealing!

Memory contributed by Peter Logie at the Messages and Memories Event at Elgin Library in June 2014

Iona Kielhorn’s first job as a P.E. Teacher in Reading

James Ramsey MacDonald in his PM's office

Iona’s Grandfather, James Ramsey MacDonald in his PM’s office

Iona chose to become a P.E. teacher as she was good at sport. Iona enjoyed her teacher training course at Dartford P.E. College. It was a three-year course. The course included Tennis, Athletics, Hockey, Netball, Rounders and Swimming. There were also courses in Physiology, Physiotherapy and Anatomy. The course counted 1 1/2 years towards a medical degree at London medical School.

Iona with one of her Great grandmother Annie Ramsay's dresses.
Iona with one of her Great grandmother Annie Ramsay’s dresses.

After Iona began working as a P.E.teacher she still participated in sporting activities herself. She was a member of the Anglo-Scots Club, which was based in London. The club was developed for Scots who lived in England. Iona competed at an Anglo-Scots Event where she became Scottish Discus Champion. Her next school post was at a mixed school, Cedar Grammar School in Leighton Buzzard. She met her husband when he was an exchange student in the UK travelling from North Germany. He was attending Wurzberg University. They married and Iona moved to Germany, where she settled for the next forty years. They had two sons.

Pathe news Joan MacDonald wedding

Pathe news reel footage of Joan MacDonald and Alistair MacKinnon’s wedding in 1932

Both of Iona’s parents were doctors. Her Father, Alistair MacKinnon was born in South Africa. Her mother was Dr. Joan MacDonald. Her grandmother was Margaret Gladstone MacDonald and her grandfather was James Ramsay MacDonald, the first Labour Prime Minister.

James Ramsay MacDonald was born in Lossiemouth, Moray. He had wanted to a teacher of Science.

Ramsay MacDonald on a Gordonstoun School boat

Ramsay MacDonald on a Gordonstoun School boat in the mid 1930s

He wrote poetry when he was as young as sixteen. Having held the post of Student Teacher at Drainie Primary School for a number of years he moved to Bristol and worked on his Science degree.  James helped his friend Kurt Hahn, former Headmaster of Salem School in Germany, to leave imprisonment in 1932. The letter James wrote is still on display at the school he founded, Gordonstoun in Moray. He also founded the Outward Bound Association, United World Colleges and Duke of Ediinburgh Award Scheme.

Memory contributed by Iona Keilhorn from Lossiemouth

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Additional information

Ramsey MacDonald Heritage trail brochureRamsay MacDonald Heritage Trail
There is a colourful brochure which accompanies an informative walk through the streets of Lossiemouth, his home town and beyond.

Picture library about Ramsey MacDonald

Picture library about Ramsey MacDonald. There are number of pages on this website which relate to the story of Ramsey MacDonald and his links to Lossiemouth.

Moray Connections- James Ramsay MacDonald

Ramsey MacDonald’s Family plot is in Spynie Churchyard

Here is some information which Iona wrote about her Grandfather and one of her Aunts.
Picture set 1
Mountain named after his daughter
Vancouver’s Tribute to Burns in which Ramsay MacDonald gave the Immortal Memory.

Spartacus International Ramsey MacDonald bookAn online article about Ramsey MacDonald including numerous orignal letters and links to the original sources.

Historic Visit to the US in 1929
As Prime Minister he made a historic visit to the United States in 1929. He was the first British Prime Minister to address the U.S. House of Representatives on October 7th 1929. He received a souvenir medal to commemorate the Historic visit.

The Straits Times, 15 October 1929, Page 12- US newspaper cutting

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Pathé News

Pathé News recently uploaded many of their films onto the internet. They include several showing Ramsay MacDonald and often his daughter Joan.

“Newsreel archive British Pathé has uploaded its entire collection  85,000 historic films, in high resolution, to its YouTube channel. This unprecedented release of vintage news reports and cinemagazines is part of a drive to make the archive more accessible to viewers all over the world.”

Ramsey MacDonald as prime minister and politician. Working in his study as PM.

Pathe news Ramsay MacDonald at work as PM

Pathe news Ramsay MacDonald at work as PM

Pathe news reel Chequers 1924

Pathe news reel showing Joan and her Father, James at Chequers 1924

Pathe news reel Ramsay Macdonald plane ride

Pathe news reel showing Ramsay Macdonald alighting from a plane ride

Working in Nethy Bridge by Margaret Lloyd

Nethy Bridge Hotel © Copyright Dave Fergusson and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Nethy Bridge Hotel © Copyright Dave Fergusson and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

Margaret’s first job was working at the Nethy Bridge Hotel in the “still room”. It was a summer holiday job before going to college. Her job included making pots of tea and melba toast. Coffee was made in a Kona filter coffee machine. She remembers spending hours making toast in front of a hot grill. Margaret earned £8 a week and her board and lodgings. There was a substantial end of season bonus of  £40! The hotel customers were often involved in hunting, shooting and fishing pursuits. The customers’ hunting dogs had their meals prepared by the hotel’s chefs, often eating leftover meats from the restaurant supplies. Many customers were very wealthy and it was really the first opportunity for Margaret to meet and mix closely with wealthier members of society.

800px-Law_Courts_entrance,_Parliament_Square by Kim Traynor This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

Court Sessions is held inside the Parliament Buldings, Edinburgh by Kim Traynor. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

At college Margaret studied hotel management. She decided later to take the civil service exam and went on to work for the Court of Sessions in Edinburgh. At that time everyone who wished to be granted a divorce in Scotland had to travel to Edinburgh to have their case heard. There were a variety of reasons which could be cited including desertion, cruelty, adultery, insanity and bigamy.

Memory contributed by Margaret Lloyd from Keith

Additional Information

James_Ettles_newsagent_Keith

This is the shop which her grandfather, James Ettles ran early in the 20th century.

Margaret’s grandfather was James Ettles from the Banffshire town of Keith where he ran a popular newsagent/bookshop/toyshop at the top of Mid Street. At Christmas time he changed the room at the back of the shop into a Santa’s Grotto. He often put aside toys for people to pay for in instalments and collect later. Traditionally Christmas day was a working day and New Year is a holiday. Some people chose to pick up toys to give on New Year. When James’ housekeeper retired Margaret moved with her family into the shop in Keith. Her Father, Bill gave up his job as a schoolteacher in Aberlour to work in the shop and help his Father. Bill found he did not like the job as much as his work as a schoolteacher and after two years returned to the “chalkface” in an English/Geography teaching role at Keith Grammar School starting at the new school building in 1964. Later he moved to Buckie High School retiring as Principal Teacher of Geography in 1983. The old Keith Grammar was used as a community centre for a few years and was eventually demolished. James sold the shop in 1968. More information here. 

Bill Ettles book about History of Keith SchoolsBill wrote a book later in life about Keith and its History of Schools. A portion of this book can be read in Keith Primary School Memory blog, where the section about Keith Primary School is reproduced (with permission).

Prior to coming to Keith Bill worked at the Orphanage School in Aberlour. The family had lived in a cottage up the Brae. There was a great social life in Aberlour. She remembers Dr John Caldwell and his Aunt, Dr Beatrice Sellar. Dr Bee once checked her ears to see if “the Measles were having a tea party”.

The location of Kate and Francis McConachie's Chemist shop in Keith

The location of Kate and Francis McConachie’s Chemist shop in Keith

Great Aunts Kate and Francis’ McConachie ‘s Chemist Shop in Keith- Her Great Aunt Kate took her Pharmaceutical Exam in Edinburgh at the Royal Pharmaceutical Society. There was a tradition there that if you passed the exam you could leave the building by the front door and it not you left by the back and had to try again. Kate left by the front door. She had not attended a college but had learnt on the job. Her sister, Francis helped her sister in the Chemist Shop as an assistant.  

History of Pharmacy

Elsewhere on this Memory Blog Aberlour resident, George Watt has spoken about his memories of working for Kate and Francis during the 1940s. Read it here.

Rabbit Catcher’s daughter by Hettie Milne neé Coutts

Hettie’s memories of life at Burghead School during WW2 >>>>>

Burghead 48 King Street Hettie Milne

48 King Street Burghead

Hettie was born in Burghead, Moray at 48 King Street in 1932 and she is therefore proud to be known as a “brocher”. Her mother came from Glenlivet and her Father, James “Jimmy” from Aberdeenshire. His family lived on a small holding in Aberdeenshire. He was the eldest son born in 1907 and he had to leave school at the age of 14 to work on the family farm. There were no tractors and part of Jimmy’s job was to drove cattle. Around 1920 they decided to move to Cullerne Farm, a new bigger farm located between Kinloss and Findhorn. So it was that one day his mother, younger brothers, sisters, 2 cows, a few sheep, chickens, Granny Jeannie Coutts on the cart and all their worldly goods set off. They were led by Jimmy as they started on their journey via Rhynie over the Cabrach, down Rothes Glen and onto Findhorn.

Burghead 69a Dunbar Street Hettie Milne

69 Dunbar Street

By the time that Hettie was born in 1932 her father had left Cullerne farm (at the age of 21) and moved to the nearby fishing settlement of Burghead.  One of her earliest memories is of a small shop in Findhorn. They lived at the top of town at 69a Dunbar Street. Prior to this they lived in 48 King Street. Her first job was “tattie” picking. During September/October the schools closed for what was known as the Tattie holidays (they still do). This break coincided with the readiness of the potato harvest. Hettie along with other local children, (usually aged 12 and over)  waited by the school at Burghead for a tractor and bogie to come and pick them up to start work at 7.30 a.m. each day. They started work at 8 a.m.  with short breaks until 5 at night. The tatties were collected in galvanized buckets and then poured into a wire basket. A young lad held the reins of the horse as older men tipped the basket contents into the cart. Each of the children had brought their own “piece” (snack) or lunch with them. This could be two slices of bread with corned beef or dry sandwiches with margarine and jam.   Occasionally they hunted the hedgerows for brambles sometimes taking them home at the end of the day. Some farms had apple orchards they could pick apples from.  They took or were given cold drinks. Flasks were too expensive and too easily broken.The money made from tattie picking was used to buy them a new winter coat and shoes. Any left over could be used for a bar of chocolate.

When Hettie left school she went to work for the Forestry Commission at Newton Nurseries from 1946-1951 from the age of 14 to 19 years. Her job involved replanting forests in Culbin Sands, Clashindarroch and Roseisle. She was also involved in reseeding young trees. At Heldon Hill Hettie cleared the lower branches from the trees so they could be used for telegraph poles.

Wester Alves farm  © Copyright Steven Brown and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/

Wester Alves farm © Copyright Steven Brown and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

In 1951 she went to work for Miss Grant, a lady farmer at Wester Alves farm. Cattlemen brought the milk into the dairy and left it to stand. The butter and cream comes to the top. It is then put into a milk churn and the handles are turned until a flopping sound is created when the butter has formed. The butter is weighed out into the right size. Miss Grant took the butter into town (Elgin) to give to her friends. Eventually Miss Grant was taken ill. Her brother-in-law Sir Alexander Murray offered her job in London. as did his daughter, Mrs Robinson in Edinburgh. Hettie decided to say “No” to both and to go back to her Forestry Commission work.

Rabbits_on_ a_fence_source: Hettie Milne

Typical rabbit catch for Jimmy Coutts, Rabbit Catcher, Burghead. Photo Source: Hettie Milne neé Coutts

Rabbit catching
Hettie’s father, Jimmy Milne was a Rabbit catcher. This was a reserved occupation during WW2 as due to shortages of meat and therefore rationing rabbit had become one of the main replacements for the UK population. The shortages were due to the torpedoing of merchant shipping by U-boats. This led to a national shortage of a variety of foodstuffs including corn, wheat, sugar and meat. Jimmy MilneWild rabbits were prolific during this period and farmers were more than happy for Hettie’s Father to catch rabbits on their land. He paid the farmers for using their land. Country folk have always eaten rabbit, hare, pheasant and duck. Each evening he set his traps along the runs, which splayed out naturally from the rabbits’ warrens. The rabbits left a groove where their runs were. Sometimes Hettie would help her Father set the traps using a paraffin lamp to light their way. Apart from using snares he also held a 2.2 gun licence. Jimmy also kept ferrets to flush out the rabbits when the ground was too hard to set snares. He could tell when the rabbits were in their warrens as there was fresh sand outside their holes. Hettie would help her father set the traps by twising the wire and going out to collect the rabbits. He came home with a rattling car and a basket of traps to repair. Her Mother, Christina also helped by winding up a snare wire with a “thraw” hook. James put his rabbits into crates and then sent his rabbits via train down to butchers’ shops in England.

Hettie’s Mother, Christina worked at Gordonstoun when her children were older. It was hard work due to the nature of the stone floors. She also cleaned for a teacher’s wife who had a house on the bus route.

The following morning at about half past four he set off to collect the rabbits from his snares before the local wildlife had a chance to help themselves first.

In the summertime the family went to Glenlivet where her Mother was from. Christina and James had married at Achbreck Church, Glenlivet on 24 December 1931. To get there they went on the bus to Elgin, then train to Dufftown, bus to Tomintoul and then got off at Tomnavoulin. There were no street signs or road signs to take them there. You just had to know the way. The signage had been removed for the duration of WW2 in case of german invasion. Hettie’s Father continued to catch rabbits throughout their Glenlivet trips, taking his crates of rabbits to Dufftown and Glenlivet stations for transport south. In addition to sending his catch south he also supplied local butchers as well. There were poachers operating in the area as well though they had to try to sell their catch door to door.

Memory contributed by Hettie Milne from Elgin

Additional information

Childhood memories of Burghead by Hettie Milne nee Coutts by Hettie Milne

Hettie’s brother was Country singer Frankie Coutts. He had formed a duo with Willie Sutherland in the 1960s and 70s. He was well-known in Moray.

Book Binder Assistant in Aberdeen by Jane MacDonald

Jane started work in 1948 as a book binder’s assistant for a Printers between Union Street and St. Nicholas Street in Aberdeen. She was 17 years old. She fed the cutting machine, which cut the paper for the books. There were three different paper sizes for the books. She didn’t see the printing side of the operation. Jane worked from Monday to Friday from 8 a.m.- 5 p.m alongside another girl on the same shift. One person fed the paper into the cutting machine and the other person took out the paper and put the cut paper into boxes. Even though they did not wear protective gloves she doesn’t remember getting paper cuts. There was a break in the morning in a small kitchen. Jane worked there for just over a year. In 1949 there was a paper shortage so the job stopped as the printing company had to lose staff when the production stopped and the paper supply halted. Jane lost her job along with another girl who had started at the same time following the “last in first out ” principle.

Her next job was at the Woolworths at Union Street in Aberdeen as a sales assistant. Rationing was still in place from the Second World War. Customers had to present coupons and were only allowed so many sweets each. Each coupon was cut out of the ration book. The counter had a variety of sweets including Liquorice Allsorts, caramels, fruit gums, fruit pastilles, pontefract cakes (liquorice) and pan drops (form of white mint imperial). Hard candy was presented in long trays to be broken into pieces with a hammer. 

Generally they could not get chocolate if they did get the occasional boxes of chocolates there were long lines of people queuing for them. Adults bought most of the sweets as the Mother in the family often had control of the sweet coupons. They were in a family ration book and if it was lost it would not be replaced so children would not usually be entrusted with it.

Jane then moved upstairs to the Grocery counter. Jane enjoyed working at Woolworths. Mainly women worked there with the exceptions of the Manager and the Under Manager (Mr France). The Grocery sold dry goods such as tea, cocoa, rice, flour, oats, soup mix etc…. but no coffee. Tea was sold in packages as was the cocoa. There was very little fruit to sell. Occasionally loose biscuits would arrive and then there would be a long queue for that.

Memory contributed by Jane MacDonald from Keith

Additional Information

A blog by a graphic design student shows pictures of the Woolworths building along with information on the closure of the Woolworths shops.

The High Street Blog showing Woolworths on Union Street, Aberdeen There is also a page with photographs of the Woolworths shop then and now.

RCAHMS add new resource links on WW1 in Scotland

RCAHMS WW1 resourcesRoyal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS) website has updated its database on buildings and structures established as part of the nations’ defence in World War One as the result of an extensive audit. The records feature modern and historic photographs along with extensive new information on hospitals, prisoner of war camps, air stations, anti-aircraft defence, firing ranges, barracks, naval yards etc…

Home front heritage revealed in new study of WWI Scotland
Browse hundreds of records of sites and structures established for the defence of Scotland during the First World War.

Moray-specific information is revealed in this RCAHMS Built Heritage Report
pg 62 Moray’s drill halls, pg 47 Table 22 Auxilliary hospitals and p67 Firing ranges.